The century began with the country ruled by the Hanoverian Dynasty of George III and ended in the Victorian Age ending in Queen Victoria’s death in 1901. It was a period of rapid change and innovation in many sectors of the economy and life. However in the rural economy of the Claydons the influence on life was not great.


 

The repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846 caused a serious depression in many parts of the rural economy, but the heavy clay in this area meant that  pastureland was predominant and that most activity  was in cattle, milk and sheep.
The land ownership held by the Verney family restricted the worst of the agricultural hardship.

The coming of the railway at Granborough Road in 1863 opened up the market for milk to the London market.The Aylesbury and Buckingham Railway was a link  between the GWR and Great Central. It was financed by the local aristocracy including the Rothchilds, Dukes of Buckingham and Harry Verney.


However the living conditions and work remained hard and demanding. The workforce was split into Tenant Farmers and farm labourers.
Most of the properties remained the timber framed thatch


The need for improved housing resulted in a new brick properties being built by the Estate. In the period between 1839 and 1893  over twelve  dwellings suitable for the employed staff were built.  These cottages were all built in a similar style. They are one and a half storey dwellings with pointed gables and dormers  that complements the earlier thatch cottages.
This became the “Verney Style” and has been recognised by the planning authority in later years as a pattern to be reflected in later developments and infill sites.

In 1864 a major farmhouses were built for the local Tenant Farmers  Bernwood Farm in Botolph and in 18xx Verney Farm in East Claydon